Statement

In 1994, Frankie Quinn published Interface Images, his first book of 'peaceline' photography studies and the year of the first ceasefires in Northern Ireland. 
By 2008 Frankie published his second book Streets Apart, furthering his study of the interface areas that surround him and introducing a panoramic capture of the walls themselves. 
Today Frankie continues with an additional series, Towards 2023, in response to the commitment made by First Minister Peter Robinson and deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness to remove the walls by 2023.
Vicky final scans033.jpg
"QUINN'S PEACELINE PHOTOGRAPHY IS A VITAL REMINDER THAT THERE WILL BE NO REAL PEACE UNTIL THESE BARRIERS, AND THE SECTARIAN PRINCIPLES UNDERPINNING THEM, CAN BE DISMANTLED."
The images of the peacelines that Frankie Quinn has gathered since 2002 offer a compelling portrait of continued division. the panoramic medium is ideally suited to the content - extended lengths of unique urban architecture - especially where the steel fences scythe between swathes of abandoned or demolished land and grey lowering skies. Blocked doors and gateways show where embattlement has closed off any point of contact. Desolate housing and vandalism are leitmotifs of a lack of emotional as well as economic investment.  
These are sharp reminders of the real depths of division. In one image an Orange Parade 'breaches' the 'peaceline'. In another a pallid statue of the Virgin Mary stands sentinel behind a spiked fence. The barriers are also used by residents with paint, to question, to protest, and sometimes, to make the best of their environment. 

Quote & excerpt from the introduction to Streets Apart by Gabbi Murphy